News aggregator

Mandela/Madiba

Nettime - 7 December, 2013 - 02:58
As we recognize, mourn and celebrate Mandela/Madiba it might be worthwhile to circulate and examine the <http://www.info.gov.za/view/DownloadFileAction?id=188939> draft South Africa ICT Policy Framing paper www.info.gov.za/view/DownloadFileAction?id=188939 This paper, I've been told by a Community Informatics colleague who is on the SA Government's Task Force that produced this document, explicitly (as in section 3.5 where principles are presented) draws inspiration in large part from the ANC's <http://gurstein.wordpress.com/2013/11/27/internet-justice-a-meme-whose-time -has-come/> Freedom Charter (1955) http://www.anc.org.za/show.php?id=72 which guided Mandela and his ANC colleagues over the decades and as they approached the work of Government. Best, Mike

Fwd: [Squares] Wikileaks, Stratfor, Srdja Popovic,and Occupy Wall Street

Nettime - 6 December, 2013 - 03:31
Evolving story about Popovic / Otpor / Canvas, Movement.org and Waging Nonviolence. It seems Hammond and Wikiilek's helped massively in unravelling the source of massive conspiracy theory, which has been shadowing the reality of uprisings taking place in recent years and preventıng them to go viral, globally.. ---------- Forwarded message ---------- From: Zoe Alif <zoealif< at >gmail.com> Date: 5 December 2013 21:14 Subject: [Squares] Wikileaks, Stratfor, Srdja Popovic, and Occupy Wall Street To: squares< at >lists.takethesquare.net Below are a series of articles this past week about internationally acclaimed activist, Srdja Popovic, and his involvement with the private intelligence firm Stratfor. Article from Waging NonViolence defending Popovic by Bryan Farrell http://wagingnonviolence.org/2013/11/stratfor-canvas/ Article from Occupy.com investigation of Srdja Popovic by Steve Horne and Carl Gibson http://www.occupy.com/article/exposed-globally-renowned-activist-collaborated-intelligence-firm-stratfor Artic

Re: Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 5 December, 2013 - 20:20
> (I also have my doubts that shifting identities really solves the > problem of reverse identification through computational analytics > as it only adds one layer of obfuscation. Live in a small remote > village, for example, and these means won't help because the one > person buying The New York Times in the local market will always be > identifiable no matter what Bitcoin address s/he'll use for payment. > You could argue that there's no anonymity of transactions in a > village anyway, but it becomes quite a different story if all those > transactions become world-readable on the Internet.) No society, no people need rules against things which are impossible. Today I observe a couple fornicating on a roof top in circumstances where I can never know who the couple are. Do they have privacy? The answer is "no" if your definition of privacy is the absence of observability. The answer is "yes" if your definition of privacy is the absence of identifiability. Technical progress in image acquisiti

Re: Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from past e-currency

Nettime - 5 December, 2013 - 19:48
On 12/05/2013 01:41 PM, Florian Cramer wrote: I totally agree here. One should not confuse technical with social characteristics. Big Data makes de-anonymization is easier than ever. There is a really fascinating write-up of the unmasking of Dread Pirate Robert, the persona behind silk road. It wasn't that codes were broken, or secrets stolen, but Ulbricht, the guy running the site, was unable to consistently separate the different social personas, so in the end they could correlate them and connect them to a physical body. [1] Besides, one has to wonder where the utopia of anonymous transactions comes from. In a way, this is exactly what any market promises: exchanges that are cleared on the spot and leave no social obligation behind because accounts have been settled through the exchange of equivalents. A good is precisely as much worth as the price that is being paid for it, and after than, buyer and seller can part ways, never to meet again. Karl Polyani, a long time ago, talked about his as the dis-

Re: Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 5 December, 2013 - 18:41
Point taken, but the structural problem remains: That the currency is _intrinsically_ coupled to accounts - accounts out in the open, on top of that - and means of payment. Anonymous payment will always require the complex deflection/circumvention devices you describe. If it's not default behavior (like in cash), anonymity/privacy boils down to an afterthought and a usability hassle. If Bitcoin becomes a popular means of payment, its users would be as unlikely to constantly make and shift new addresses as they are unlikely to shift E-Mail addresses and login identities on Web services right now. (I also have my doubts that shifting identities really solves the problem of reverse identification through computational analytics as it only adds one layer of obfuscation. Live in a small remote village, for example, and these means won't help because the one person buying The New York Times in the local market will always be identifiable no matter what Bitcoin address s/he'll use for payment. You could argue th

Re: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from past

Nettime - 5 December, 2013 - 11:44
As a Marxist (more or less in agreement with the 2nd International), I have to say these two recently popular concepts on the Left need to be critically evaluated. For "anti-capitalist": this would be considered in Hegel-speak a "simple negation" and doesn't specify much at all. The so-called "precariat" is a recent invention that repeats the post-60s habit of searching for the "new revolutionary subject," i.e. something other than the proletariat. I'm not challenging it as a sociological description but rather as a political category. It is nothing more than a rebranded "lumpenproletariat," currently being pushed by outfits such as the ISO which are floudering quite badly at the moment (having failed to consolidate any decent energy post-#Occupy). -dl On Wed, Dec 4, 2013 at 3:42 PM, Jaromil <jaromil-/YyWnpLq9OY< at >public.gmane.org> wrote: <....>

Re: Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 5 December, 2013 - 03:00
I guess that as far as the "value" of bitcoin will increase, more and more big players will be interested and will put financial, mathematical and technical resources to maximize their investments. Will follow a sort of arms race: normal humans will not measure up to their robots. Florian is considering a hell for privacy, I guess instead that will end with what could be the first non-human bubble. Of course, bitcoin is very nice as a technical system. This is an excellent proof of concept on the scale of the entire planet. But I do not think we will stop there. Olivier <...>

Re: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from past

Nettime - 5 December, 2013 - 02:42
Yes, it is basically a chain of contracts, triple-signed... How funny that justicialist detractors have so far fought it as a criminal tool, while even the most financially coercitive apparata have never managed to put in place such a formidable device for financial control and disintermediation. Now I wonder if projects like this will ever take off to fill the gap https://darkwallet.unsystem.net - does it really matter? being provoking and entertaining is already a success in the looming decadence of both capitalism and its critics, when they have nothing new to say. A few days ago someone pointed out at a conference that Bitcoin is the first alternative economic project that has made rich its participants. As an anti-capitalist and precarized content producer now I wonder: how much wealth we ever managed to distribute, being the ultimate life goal that of growing up to an academic position and secured income? Is that done by giggling at youtube videos of rioting kids smashing the banks? Bitcoin is r

Re: Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 4 December, 2013 - 22:38
I don't know how you figure bots will "suck all the money". Bots are made by humans necessarily, and I can assure you they are quite difficult to make profitable (unless they directly steal). The beauty of Bitcoin's "complicated" mining system is that it fixes the quantity of money in circulation to NATURE in a predictable manner. Gold is similarly fixed to nature but the earth is comparably capricious in how much it yields and where. -dl <...>

Re: Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 4 December, 2013 - 18:46
Let me know if I'm wrong: one individual may own two or more bitcoin wallets. And this individual may be a robot or a weird mixture of flesh and silicon, let say a dog which constantly "shift" its identities and deals its bitcoins with some high frequency trading system. So, obviously "cydogs" will suck all the bitcoin market at the expense of regular human beings. Bitcoin: a good money for bots, isn't it? On the contrary, openUDC ( http://www.openudc.org/ ), based on "the web of trust", ensures that traders are actually humans, not bots. There is no complicated mining system but a distributed mecanism which provides regularly a certain amount of money (a Dividend) to each one and controls the global monetary mass according their average life expectancy. Olivier On Wed, Dec 4, 2013 at 2:02 AM, Douglas La Rocca <douglarocca-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w< at >public.gmane.org> wrote: <...>

Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 4 December, 2013 - 07:02
There's a distinction between wallets and addresses. Addresses are traceable and can be analyzed in that manner. Wallets are collections of addresses which need not ever be publicly associated. Far from being *worse *than tracing credit/debit cards, because a user can constantly "shift" identities (frequently used addresses, say), Bitcoin actually makes it possible to avoid the privacy problem. In fact, the identification of total publicity and complete privacy is beautifully dialectical! -dl On Tue, Dec 3, 2013 at 7:40 PM, Douglas La Rocca <douglarocca-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w< at >public.gmane.org>wrote: <...>

Fwd: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 4 December, 2013 - 07:01
This isn't a problem at all. There are several so-called "tumblers" that can provably obscure (anonymize) transactions. The Silk Road used one before it was shut down. As far as the so-called "ordinary user" who can't be bothered to use a tumbler in practice, there are other crypto-currencies have chosen to build a tumbler into the protocol. In any case, the current ordinary practice of using bitcoins by nature encourages the use of many distinct addresses and wallets. I cannot count how many addresses I have used once and forgotten about. (There are enough addresses possible that the likelihood of generating the same one is effectively zero, and they will never run out.) There is a significant difference between Bitcoin and e-cash. Bitcoin is a currency in its own right, as well as a NEW kind of money-substance. (For the fullest exposition of the nature of money, the difference between symbol- or token-money and money-substance, and so on, see Marx's dialectical Hegelian reading in the *Grundrisse* an

Re: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 4 December, 2013 - 05:45
The devil is in the subordinate clause starting with "while" that hints at the collateral damage of the utopia you sketch. The question is whether transparency is a value per se. (I would argue: no, it's only a tool for achieving other goals such as ethical conduct and social responsibility.) Taken as a value per se, with no prisoners taken, it easily amounts to a totalitarian nightmare. Florian

Re: GoldieBlox, fair use, and the cult of disruption

Nettime - 3 December, 2013 - 23:04
For fans of the Beastie Boys, GoldieBlox don't seem to know very much about them (or how to use apostrophes): "We want you to know that when we posted the video, we were completely unaware that the late, great Adam Yauch had requested in his will that the Beastie Boys songs never be used in advertising." http://gigaom.com/2013/11/27/goldieblox-removes-beastie-boys-lyrics-from-girl-power-video-smart-or-cynical/ GoldieBlox had more of a case than many people think: http://waxy.org/2013/11/goldieblox_and_the_three_mcs/ But if I had to choose a poster child for Fair Use, this certainly wouldn't be it.

Re: GNUnion (Global Networked Labour Union)

Nettime - 3 December, 2013 - 21:29
renewed text with a call, please feel free to spread and collaborate, it is an opensource and libre project which takes the rise of the GNU as an inspiration to it self. The target is the liberation and opensourcing and transcending the entirr capitalist mode of production. Let's free the production and free ourselves.. http://snuproject.wordpress.com/2013/12/03/gnunion-global-networked-labour-union-join-the-one-big-meshwork-now/ On 1 December 2013 23:24, Chapullers OrsanS <orsan1234-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w< at >public.gmane.org> wrote: <...>

GoldieBlox, fair use, and the cult of disruption

Nettime - 3 December, 2013 - 15:37
GoldieBlox, fair use, and the cult of disruption By Felix Salmon, November 26, 2013 http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2013/11/26/goldieblox-fair-use-and-the-cult-of-disruption/ innovation | intellectal property | technology If you google “disrupt the pink aisle”, you’ll get 36,800 results, all of which concern a San Francisco-based toy company named GoldieBlox. The company first came to public attention in September of last year, when it launched a highly-successful Kickstarter campaign which ultimately raised $285,881. Like all successful Kickstarter campaigns, there was a viral video; this one featured a highly-photogenic CEO called Debbie, a recent graduate of — you probably don’t need me to tell you this — Stanford University. And yes, before the Kickstarter campaign, there was “a seed round from friends, family and angel investors”. When the viral video kept on generating pre-orders even after the Kickstarter campaign ended, GoldieBlox looked like a classic Silicon Valley startup: youn

Re: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 3 December, 2013 - 14:02
Florian Cramer writes: > Another way of looking at Bitcoin is to consider it an unintended privacy > nightmare in the making. ... > This is even much worse than credit or debit cards whose transaction > records at least aren't fully out in the public, and which still can > be circumvented by paying cash. Compared to current situation it actually gets better, or more democratic at least. Selected influential 3-letter agencies already have access to your bank transaction log, no matter what, if kept in regular bank. Now everybody has access to your bank transaction log, but so do you, to everybodys transaction log. While I understand that individual humans need to enjoy greater privacy than commercial or government entities (that, to my opinion, should not expect any privacy regarding their monetary- or other issues) this thing that everybody has copy of everybodys wallet relieves big and small companies and any other money-handling organizations, including the (now almost obsolete) banks, from produ

Re: Fwd: Networking Labour and Social Movements vis-a-visClient-Server

Nettime - 3 December, 2013 - 02:36
Hi Orsans, Thanks for your work on the networked labour site and its content. I think its a good start for folks to discover new materials and tools that are useful in their endeavours. One simple suggestion from the tech standpoint would be the use of https for the site's delivery. I think that could provide others with an additional sense of security when utilizing the information there. Do you think its feasible to implement ? Gregory On Fri, Nov 29, 2013 at 12:45 PM, Chapullers OrsanS <orsan1234-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w< at >public.gmane.org>wrote: <...>

Re: Stephen Foley: Bitcoin needs to learn from paste-currency

Nettime - 3 December, 2013 - 00:42
Another way of looking at Bitcoin is to consider it an unintended privacy nightmare in the making. Bitcoin is based on the concept that money is stored in anonymized accounts ("wallets") whose transactions are publicly viewable; that is, all Bitcoin transactions ever made by anyone, permanently archived. Supposed that Bitcoin becomes an everyday means of payment, including for supermarket bills, public transport tickets, rents, salaries etc., it would not require very much ingenuity or computational power to analyze all transactions associated to one Bitcoin wallet and, from the frequencies, quantities and network of its transactions, deduce the identity of its owner with practical certainty. For a law enforcement agency or any other third party, it would most likely suffice to know somebody's recurring bill, preferably via continually changing amounts of money charged every month (such as a phone or electricity bill), in order to get full insight into an individual's wallet, her or his everyday money spend

Re: a free letter to the creative commons and for theconsideration

Nettime - 2 December, 2013 - 06:01
The possibility of a different brand for non-free CC licenses was discussed as a possibility during the public development of the 4.0 licenses. CC decided not to pursue the idea at this time. :-( # distributed via <nettime>: no commercial use without permission # <nettime> is a moderated mailing list for net criticism, # collaborative text filtering and cultural politics of the nets # more info: http://mx.kein.org/mailman/listinfo/nettime-l # archive: http://www.nettime.org contact: nettime< at >kein.org