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Nuit Debout

Nettime - 11 April, 2016 - 15:47
France: Nocturnal protests 'to change the world' gather force Published: 11 Apr 2016 07:53 GMT+02:00 http://www.thelocal.fr/20160411/france-nuits-debouts-night-protests-to-change-the-word-gather-strength Riot police moved in on Monday to clear out Place de la Republique in Paris, which has become home to nocturnal protests as hundreds have gathered to air their many grievances as well as sing and drink beer. But how will it end ? It wasn't immediately clear if Monday morning's evacuation of the famous square in Paris meant protesters would be forbidden from returning as they have done each evening for the last 11 nights. What is clear though is that the "Nuit Debout" (which roughly translates as "Rise Up at Night") movement appears to be growing in strength rather than dying out and the authorities in Paris are unlikely to risk barring them from their headquarters just yet. Following the evacuation, which removed the wooden fences and structures built by protesters, the organizers of Nuit Debout immedia

a free letter to cultural institutions digitizing thepublic domain

Nettime - 10 April, 2016 - 18:21
a free letter to cultural institutions digitizing the public domain material, please do not enclose the public domain when you digitize the material that is already in public domain. give the peers the freedom that you make use of when building on the public domain and encourage them to build on what you have built. license the digitized public domain material with a free/libre cultural license: dedicate it to the public domain; or use a free/libre cultural license that requires attribution, if you rightfully want to achieve the recognition and the appreciation you deserve for your valuable work; or use a copyleft free cultural license if you also want to prevent commercial exploitation of your work. copyleft attitude is more than enough to do so, and even encourages another economics, which is not based on accumulation of capital. just count on libre donations and libre labour of your peers. avoid "non-commercial", "no-derivatives", "open access" etc vocabulary, which are exploitations of free/libre

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 7 April, 2016 - 23:02
Berger makes those points, but they're drowned out by all his cranky noise -- like the opening words: What did you learn from the Panama Papers? That African, Russian, Ukrainian and Asian 'elites' are corrupt? Well, this should have been known a for long time... I'm deeply skeptical about 'data journalism,' but Berger's dismissal -- in his second paragraph -- is just silly: the ICIJ...seems to mix up investigative journalism with data journalism. The latter, a new form of journalism, takes some database and looks, with filters and search terms, for info snippets that lend themselves to headlines. And so on. Yes, many other people have made the same points -- and done a much better job of it. Funding sources do indeed exert subtle and not-so-subtle pressure on journalists -- I've experienced this firsthand and returned half of a substantial 'journalism' grant when the funder tried to tell me what I couldn't say. So, yes, the US-centrism of the funders is a serious con

Re: 'responsible' handling of the Panama Papers

Nettime - 7 April, 2016 - 21:46
Excellent, Ted. I think what the "responsible" journalists don't get is that this isn't about criminal wrong-doing (well some of it is). The problem at its base isn't about whether folks did or did not break the law but rather that the law itself is wrong (most certainly the result of effective lobbying by the 1% and others) allowing for folks to get out of paying what they should be paying in tax. (The folks demonstrating in Iceland seem to have got this right.) So the objective here is not to save the innocent, in this circumstance there may be relatively few or even no innocents, rather it is how to contribute to a global campaign to put laws on the books to ensure that everyone is paying their fair share. So as you most effectively argue, the more information the better, and the journo's involved need a lot wider input into the filters that they are using for saving us from ourselves. And we all should be remembering that the biggest and most egregious tax dodgers aren't the Messi's and Cameron's

Re: 'responsible' handling of the Panama Papers

Nettime - 7 April, 2016 - 21:20
So far Panama Papers have been infinitesimal, ldespite the humongous bloviation: 184 files, 651 pages, about .0015% of the unsubstantiated mad-dog frothing 11.5 Million. Papers hosts claim all froth will not be released, to not madden the public, not like an unspeakable gutter cur WL, but have not yelped how many will be frothcoming nor when the residue will be disappeared by computer error handover to government bounty rewarders (at 30% of the taxes recovered - whistleblowing is top route to top and confidential). 400 shit and shinola Panama Paper withholderss could become Silicon Alley millionaires by complying with an IRS-NGO secrecy agreement like Greenwald, Taibbi and Cie by diverting attention from Omidyar-Bezos-Slim bribing press hallelujah of wealth for fearless journalism and offshore Tor's faux anonymity Panamanian sting. Enlarged narrative confections of the itty-bitty evidence, lately jumped on board by the New York Times by hyperbolized quoting the hosts in lieu of demanding extensive proof a

'responsible' handling of the Panama Papers

Nettime - 7 April, 2016 - 20:08
Here's a mail I just sent to a list devoted to discussion of 'responsible data.' Cheers, T - - - - - - - 8< SNIP! 8< - - - - - - - Hi, all -- I appreciate that a forum devoted to responsible data is what it says on the tin, but I want to question the reflexive assumption that journalists' gatekeeping role is the most responsible course of action in the case of the Panama Papers. It may be the most *defensible* and it may be the most *professional*, but a lot of other freight can be smuggled in under labels like that. That's basically what Mossack Fonseca did: use anodyne language to mask activities that -- to put it charitably -- benefited the few at the expense of the many. And while it would be grossly unfair to lump the investigative journalists working on the papers together with MF's staff, it is a *fact* that, for the purposes of public access to the vast majority of the documents, the actions of both groups will have the same outcome. And that's a material fact, because it is how man

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 7 April, 2016 - 17:05
To assure official and congenial approval and financial support for disclosure it is essential to choral "not like WikiLeaks" then scream big numbers and Titanic significance, yes dear passengers, the ship is unsinkable. Why even the Snowden Unsinkable Molly Brown distances itself from the horrifying Lusitania. And why not, impermeable WikiLeaks assures its sailors that really, really big, super important, government-shaking, "Leaks" (capitalized as in capital) have established the benchmark for pleasant voyages through turbulent seas of mega-tera bytes of digital flotsam and plastic. Never mind that disclosures upsetting to Queegs are as old as Queens, the customary way of succeeding the flag officers with new, terrifically bloated and blared ways to get off asses and mass steal from the super-big stealers. Where in the Panama (nee Pentagon) Papers are the riches of Cuba, Nicaragua, North Korea, Sudan, all the rogues so irritating to Wall Street-ICBM itchy fingers ready to annex ever more Truman Doctrin

Re: salafi easter and finis europae: let's break the loop

Nettime - 7 April, 2016 - 16:52
This picture that Alex paints of the allegiance that most people feel for nations expressed through the nation state as: -an ominous landscape- has like all caricatures some truth. But still it is a caricature and reflects a wider problem for the left. Benedict Anderson described the problem in 1983 in his classic -Imagined Communities- where he defined the nation as -an imagined political community- imagined as both inherently limited and sovereign-. It is IMAGINED - he continues- because members of even the smallest nation will never know most of of their fellow members, meet them or even hear from them, yet in the mind of each lives the image of their communion.. It is partly Benedict?s background as a thinker with strong Marxist background that drives his desire to come to terms with the fact that -nationalism has proved an uncomfortable anomaly for Marxist theory and precisely for that reason has been elided rather than confronted?. At the time he was writing -every successful revolution since WW

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 7 April, 2016 - 13:15
Berger is by far not the only one with this opinion. After I posted his article here, WikiLeaks retweeted the link to Nettime's archive and Berger's piece. Before, Wikileaks tweeted the following (so we can consider it WikiLeaks' official position on the matter: "In total, Guardian has released, 2 #PanamaPapers documents. S

In Plain Sight: The Alliance for an Affordable Internet:Discussion Summation

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 21:33
The below has been adapted from the original blogpost (with very extensive links/referencing) at: https://gurstein.wordpress.com/2016/04/05/the-a4ai-discussion-a-summation/ As some of you will know I recently published a blogpost which presents a detailed critique of the A4AI (the Alliance for an Affordable Internet) "Best Practices" document; and a second blogpost which presents a detailed alternative set of "Best Practices". These have generated quite a lengthy and sometimes heated discussion on some broader e-lists of interest to the Internet policy community (specifically governance-UtHtnd/jhlLpgJrhxKc9hB2eb7JE58TQ< at >public.gmane.org, the e-list for civil society in Internet Governance; and internetpolicy-/SL4NtFI+qL9DtjTS/Z7tA< at >public.gmane.org , the policy e-list for the Internet Society (ISOC). Overall the discussion has generated some 200 or so individual posts with some continuing to be posted. I'm biased of course, but as the discussion progressed and as it forced me to go deeper into the backgro

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 20:45
But Florian, don't you think we're at antipodes from the Cold War? And how much suspicion is really needed to understand those agendas? The elites behind the ICIJ - Ford Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Rockefeller Family Fund, Stanley Foundation and McArthur Fund - are all affiliates of the Democratic party and primarily concerned with social reproduction. Their agenda is obvious. The capacity of the Democratic party to govern is threatened in at least three ways: By lack of funds, by the overweening power of the billionaire class, and by populist revolts due to the collapse of life prospects for the majority of the population. Since 2008 the federal government has consistently decried its inability to collect taxes (from Apple, etc) and yesterday, Obama's off-the-cuff remarks about the Panama Papers were to the effect that the problem is, most of these tax havens are legal. There's a reason for that. For forty years the US capitalist class has promoted the idea that government should be

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 20:09
For now, maybe, but that won't last long. On the contrary, I think they'll quickly become *precisely* questionable, plagued with questions about agendas within agendas, the provenance and 'curation' of documents, and so on. It may sound strange to use language associated with connoisseurship in this context, but it isn't; on the contrary, this increasingly leaky world will be defined more and more deeply in aesthetic ways -- because leaks involve *media*. I'll start with one example, an argument I first heard Florian Schneider make, although aspects of it connect to a wider range of work -- for example, Eyal Weizman's forensis initiative and Rabih Mroue's meditations on visuality of confrontation. The basic idea involves a drastic change in the aesthetics of 'authority.' High resolution, precision, stability, and controlled framing used to be the dominant meta qualities of visual 'truths,' but they've given way to a counter-aesthetic: pixelated, chaotic, fragmentary, indeterminate. The more

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 18:39
Hi Florian, Could you make your suspicions a bit more explicit? What would the explicit agenda of ICIJ be? Do you have more reasons to be suspicious? I think their work in the past has been really quite solid. Best, Niels

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 17:17
> > Some crucial questions remain unanswered: Why is there no notable US > > American citizen among the "accused"? > > But not for this reason. Much more important, as Brian pointed out, > is at the US themselves have become the largest tax haven, globally. Exactly. But then we have to ask about the possible political agenda behind the Panama Papers, particularly if you consider the funders of The Center for Public Integrity that's behind 'The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists' (ICIJ). They not only include Soros, but also the Ford Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Rockefeller Family Fund, Stanley Foundation and McArthur Fund, to name only a few (https://www.publicintegrity.org/about/our-work/supporters).

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 14:34
On 2016-04-05 20:42, Florian Cramer wrote: Agreed. But not for this reason. Much more important, as Brian pointed out, is at the US themselves have become the largest tax haven, globally. Why run to Panama (which could get invaded or strong-armed at any point anyway) when you can go to Delware, Nevada or South Dakota? Well before the Panama Papers, even Bloomberg already run headline like "The World’s Favorite New Tax Haven Is the United States" [1]. [1] http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-01-27/the-world-s-favorite-n ew-tax-haven-is-the-united-states In the short term, yes, but I think what we are seeing here -- and in a myriad of other cases -- is the continuation of the slow but deep de-legitimization of an entire socio-political regime, basically, neoliberalism. This has already gotten so bad, that the only remaining selling-point is fear. And change in the status quo is fought against not with a promise (as was the case up from about 1975 to 2005) but with a threat. Most dramatically

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 10:56
On 2016-04-05 23:01, Geert Lovink wrote: This is interesting, even crucial, because now other tax authorities may obtain the data from the Australian Taxation Office, and if these requests emanate from 'rule of law', 'democratic' states (as opposed to dictatorships, bent on destroying their political opponents), there is no reason for the Australian government not to oblige. # distributed via <nettime>: no commercial use without permission # <nettime> is a moderated mailing list for net criticism, # collaborative text filtering and cultural politics of the nets # more info: http://mx.kein.org/mailman/listinfo/nettime-l # archive: http://www.nettime.org contact: nettime< at >kein.org # < at >nettime_bot tweets mail w/ sender unless #ANON is in Subject:

Re: Ten Theses on the Panama Papers

Nettime - 6 April, 2016 - 04:11
Maybe I'm missing something, but the mere notion that something that 3-400 people have access to (more likely thousands, with associates, managers, etc.) is a tight secret is ... mind boggling. And then when the logistics of distributing all these terabytes to hundreds of recipients, months ago, without a single accident, is considered, this becomes a virtually impossible proposition. On top of this, it appears that each entity got a custom subset - a major editing task. And none of these thousands - not a single one - sent a copy to Wikileaks? Give me a break. What we have here is a totally unrealistic interpretation of the reality. But then it was only a matter of time when the 'anonymous leaks' strategy will get weaponized and incorporated into media business model.
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